What Do You Want For Christmas?

“What do you want for Christmas?”

“Ask for whatever you want me to give you.”

One question.

One request.

Two different answers.

We hear the question, “What do you want for Christmas?” repeatedly this time of year. When I hear the question, I immediately think of Ralphie from the movie, A Christmas Story, sitting on the department store Santa’s lap overwhelmed and frantically trying to remember to ask for his heart’s desire; a Red Ryder BB gun.

(Here is link to the clip https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IQM_kWxrJNI)

If you were asked what you want for Christmas by Santa today, how would you answer? What would be your Red Ryder BB gun? I asked the question to a group of middle school students this week and here is some of what they said they wanted for Christmas: Timberland boots, a record player, Nike sweatpants, Adidas Superstars, Fit-Bit, iPhone, a shopping spree with gift cards, a dog and (my favorite) a profitable future career. Naturally, the answers to the question revolved around personal desires.

However, as the group transitioned from thinking about the question to the request, which was made by God, a shift in thinking occurred. The request was one that was delivered to King Solomon in a dream by God. In the dream, God requests from King Solomon, “Ask for whatever you want me to give you” (1 Kings 3:5).  This request was made to King Solomon by God as Solomon began his rule over the nation of Israel. He was a young man, around 20 years old, who lacked experience in ruling a kingdom and acknowledged this in his response to God when he states, “I am only a little child and do not know how to carry out my duties” (1 Kings 3:7).  He continues in a humble manner when addressing God as he describes himself as God’s servant and referring to the people he will be ruling to be God’s people, rather than his subjects, as he describes them as, “this great people of yours” (1 Kings 3:9). His humbleness will be key in how Solomon responds to God’s request.

In the end, how does Solomon answer God? Does he ask for things that will fulfill his personal desires such as wealth or health or power? No, Solomon doesn’t ask for any of these. Instead, he asks God for the one thing he knows he needs most to govern and lead God’s people well. He asks God to give him a discerning heart, commonly referred to as wisdom (1 Kings 3:9). Because, in his humbleness, he asks for a gift that will allow him to glorify and serve God and others well, rather than satisfy his desires, God was pleased and grants his request. “I will give you a wise and discerning heart” (1 Kings 3:12).

When asking the same middle school students to consider how they would answer God’s request of, “Ask for whatever you want me to give you,” in light of Solomon’s story, they answered with the following: One student asked to have the gift of a peacemaker so they could promote peace in their relationships. Two other students asked for the gift of speaking well so they could communicate effectively and confidently about God with their family and friends. In their answers is seen the shift from focusing on the question of wants, to honoring God’s request, by asking for gifts that will serve others and God rather than themselves.

During the Christmas season it is easy to get wrapped up (no pun intended), like Ralphie, in answering the question, “What do you want for Christmas?” However, the answer to that question is commonly focused on fulfilling personal desires. Take a different approach this year and consider how you would answer God’s request, “Ask for whatever you want me to give you.” If, like Solomon, the answer comes from humbleness and from the selfless desire to serve God and others, it will change you and your community this Christmas season and beyond for God’s glory.

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